At various developmental stages, children need different things from their parents. When you and your child’s other parent established your Texas standard possession order during your divorce, it may have worked well at the time. However, your teen may be telling you, verbally or through his or her actions, that the schedule no longer works.

Texas law does allow modifications of the original order, and if you and the other parent can agree to the changes, there is no need to go to court.

TexasLawHelp.org explains that the process begins with filling out a form requesting that the judge change your current order. Other forms may also be necessary, depending on your circumstances.

You will need to provide the other parent with copies of the completed forms. You will also need to file them with the court clerk in the county where you received your original order. After you pay the filing fee, it is a good idea to ask whether the county has specific rules for your situation. The clerk can answer your questions and stamp the forms with the date and time. The original forms will be filed, and you and the other parent each receive a copy. The other parent will need to sign these and fill out the same forms along with an answer or a waiver.

Once all the forms are complete, you will bring them with you to court and explain to the judge what the changes are and why they are in your teen’s best interest. The judge will likely sign the new order, which you can file with the court clerk.

Although this general overview of how an uncontested modification works may give you an idea of what to expect, every case is unique. Therefore, it should not be interpreted as legal advice.